In 1692, the infamous Salem witch trials took place in the coastal Massachusetts city of Salem. In that year, more than 200 men and women were accused of witchcraft, 19 of whom were convicted and hung for their “crimes.” 

In 1692, the infamous Salem witch trials took place in the coastal Massachusetts city of Salem. In that year, more than 200 men and women were accused of witchcraft, 19 of whom were convicted and hung for their “crimes.” 

The Salem Witch Museum, housed in a renovated historic church building in downtown Salem, follows the history of witches, witchcraft and witch hunts through the ages. 

Salem Witch Museum at Night
Salem Witch Museum, Salem, Mass. Credit: Salem Witch Museum

“We hope students leave our museum with a deeper understanding of how the events of the Salem witch trials unfolded, and how those events can be related to modern-day experiences,” said Rachel Christ, director of education at the museum. 

A museum visit includes two exhibit presentations; the first examines the events of 1692, while the second provides a larger view of the phenomenon of witch hunts throughout history. 

“Middle/high school students should expect to view two presentations,” Christ said. “The first takes place in a darkened auditorium, where stage sets light up to a narration describing the events of that dark year. They will then be brought into a second presentation which consists of a staff-guided tour led by a knowledgeable tour guide. During this presentation, students will learn about where the image of a witch first originated, how witch hunts began and ended in Europe, what the term ‘witch’ means today, and how witch hunts are relevant throughout history.”

The museum experience typically lasts one hour. The museum can accommodate groups of 125 students. 

“Educators and student tour planners will be able to offer a unique and comprehensive experience to their groups, which is applicable for learners of all ages,” Christ said.   

The museum is located near student-friendly restaurants and can provide a list of those establishments to travel planners. 

“We are just a short walk away from the Salem Public Common, so if students would like to bring packed lunches, they can have lunch across the street in the large open area,” Christ said.

For more information, call 978-744-1692 or visit salemwitchmuseum.com.

Previous article5 Stops: Boston, Massachusetts
Next article5 Stops: Seattle, Washington
Courtney Birchmeier oversees the editorial department at Group Tour Media. With half a decade under her belt in the group travel industry, she's eager to connect tour operators and group leaders with new destinations. It's a great day at the office if her dog, a chow/lab mix named "Kiwi," is in tow. In her free time, she enjoys reading (for fun, with no red pen in hand), sampling craft beer (New Holland Brewing's "Dragon's Milk," anyone?) and adding new destinations to her travel bucket list (like Salzburg, Austria).